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Not with standing a history dotted with earthquakes, hurricanes, fires, and Yankee bombardments, Charleston remains one of the best-preserved cities in America's Old South. It boasts 73 pre-Revolutionary War buildings, 136 from the late 18th century, and more than 600 built before the 1840s. With its cobblestone streets and horse-drawn carriages, Charleston is a place of visual images and sensory pleasures. Jasmine and wisteria fragrances fill the air; the aroma of she-crab soup (a local favorite) wafts from sidewalk cafes; and antebellum architecture graces the historic cityscape. "No wonder they are so full of themselves," said an envious visitor from Columbia, which may be the state capital but has little of Charleston's style and grace.

In 1663, King Charles II of England gave a huge part of North America to his Lord's Proprietor. This gift soon grew to encompass the entire south of the present United States. This extended from the Atlantic to the Pacific - and even included a large portion of northern Mexico, too. None of this land actually belonged to King Charles II. Seven years later, the settlers named a city after him. The selected a city where two rivers formed a peninsula along South Carolina's central coast.
This city originally named Charles Town and later changed to "Charleston," quickly grew in trade, immigration, and wealth in the Colonial South. By 1790, while New Yorkers (county population 33,000) were fixing windmills, grazing sheep, and draining swamps, Charlestonians (county population 67,000) were attending operas and piano recitals. Following the Civil War, the city lost some of its maritime prominence to other industrial ports to the north and west. In retrospect, however, this loss of prominence probably saved the city's beautiful waterfront homes, antebellum mansions, and historic core from the demolition-hungry needs of urban growth.

In 1825, Charleston became the first US city to operate a passenger steam locomotive in regular service.In its annual reader survey, Condé Nast Traveler magazine named Charleston the No. 5 city to visit in America, which places it ahead of such perennial favorites as Boston, Washington, D.C., and Santa Fe. Visitors are drawn here from all over the world, and it is now quite common to hear German and French spoken on local streets.
 
Charleston is situated on a narrow, low-lying peninsula between the Ashley and Cooper Rivers, at the head of a broad bay leading to the Atlantic Ocean. The rich, vast tidal land of the Lowcountry, which extends from Savannah, Georgia, to the South Carolina coast, is covered by numerous serpentine rivers and streams. If you are taking a plane to visit the region, make sure to look out of the window as the airplane descends. While the plane is circling low, you will be fascinated to see an infinite number of small streams interlocking with each other, forming a chain of swamps across the Carolinas and Georgia.

Not only is Charleston, South Carolina, the No. 1 vacation spot in the U.S., according to Conde Nast Traveler, the famous city also has a toe in the water of the cruise industry. Charleston launched a new-and-improved cruise terminal in 2013, and one ship, the Carnival Fantasy, offers weekly, round-trip cruises to the Bahamas and Eastern Caribbean from the port. For river cruisers, American Cruises disembarks out of Charleston from November to May.
 
A 5-Day or 7-Day Caribbean Holiday
If you're a last-minute cruiser with a flexible schedule, Fantasy's five-day cruise to the Bahamas is your best bet. With sailings nearly every week, you can usually find some last-minute savings for this whirlwind Bahamas trip. While the five-day is more flexible, keep in mind that this itinerary is limited to two stops, Nassau, and either Freeport or Little Stirrup Cay. The seven-day Eastern Caraibbean itinerary is two days longer, but you get a taste of both the Bahamas and the Caribbean islands with an additional stop in Grand Turk in the Turks and Caicos Islands, as well as Nassau and Half Moon Cay in the Bahamas. The seven-day sailing departs once a month, although no sailings are offered in January, June and September.
 
Where You are Docked
The Cruise Ship Passenger Terminal is located in downtown Charleston in the heart of the historic district. It is easily reached via several major routes into the City. The major routes into Charleston are via Interstate 26, Highway 17-South, Highway 17-North and I-526. Directions from the main thoroughfares serving Charleston are provided below.There are permanent highway signs posted along the travel route that will help direct you to Union Pier and the cruise ship facilities. Some signs are the standard green highway signs posted along major routes and exit ramps. Others are smaller sized brown signs with the international cruise ship symbol and arrows showing the direction to travel in the downtown area. Please note there are yellow A-frame signs also referred to in the directions. Those yellow A-frame signs are temporary units displayed at approximately 11:00am on embarkation days.
 
Port of Charleston
Union Pier Terminal
32 Washington Street
Charleston, South Carolina 29401
 
Union Pier Entry Gate #2 is at the intersection of Concord and Laurens and is designated as the entry point for all general cruise traffic.
Union Pier Main Gate is at 32 Washington Street and is designated as the entry point for taxis, hotel limos/vans and charter bus groups only.
 
Directions to the Cruise Ship Passenger Terminal
 
Coming into Charleston via I-26 East
Once you are in the Charleston area
 
Take Exit 219 – B (Morrison Drive and East Bay Street)
Turn left at the foot of the exit ramp
Cross over King Street, then cross over Meeting Street
Once you cross over Meeting Street, you are on Morrison Drive
Stay on Morrison Drive
The street name will change from Morrison Drive to East Bay Street after you go under an overpass
Follow the large green highway signs and the smaller brown highway signs to Union Pier Terminal
Stay on East Bay Street, until you pass a U.S. Post Office on the right
From East Bay Street, turn left on to Chapel Street at the traffic light
Continue to follow the green highway signs and the brown highway signs to the Cruise Ship Terminal / Union Pier Terminal
Chapel Street will change name to Washington Street along the route
Turn left and Chapel/Washington Street onto Charlotte Street
At the intersection of Chapel/Washington and Charlotte Streets, there will be yellow A-frame signs in the roadway with directions for ‘Cruise Traffic’.
Follow the yellow signs. These will be in addition to the permanent street signs already noted.
The yellow A-frame signs will direct you to Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Union Pier Entry Gate #2 is at the intersection of Concord and Laurens
The Passenger Terminal is part of Union Pier
All general cruise traffic enters the area via Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Coming into Charleston from 17-South (North Carolina side of South Carolina)
Enter the Charleston area via the City of Mt. Pleasant
Follow 17-South signs to Ravenel Bridge (across Cooper River)
Go across the bridge
Take Morrison Drive / East Bay Street exit from bridge (first exit)
Turn left on to East Bay Street from the exit ramp at the foot of the bridge
Follow the large green highway signs and the smaller brown highway signs to Union Pier Terminal
Stay on East Bay Street, until you pass a U.S. Post Office on the right
From East Bay Street, turn left on to Chapel Street at the traffic light
Continue to follow the green highway signs and the brown highway signs to the Cruise Ship Terminal / Union Pier Terminal
Chapel Street will change name to Washington Street along the route
Turn left and Chapel/Washington Street onto Charlotte Street
At the intersection of Chapel/Washington and Charlotte Streets, there will be yellow A-frame signs in the roadway with directions for ‘Cruise Traffic’.
Follow the yellow signs. These will be in addition to the permanent street signs already noted.
The yellow A-frame signs will direct you to Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Union Pier Entry Gate #2 is at the intersection of Concord and Laurens
The Passenger Terminal is part of Union Pier
All general cruise traffic enters the area via Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Coming into Charleston from 17-North (Georgia side of South Carolina)
 
Enter the Charleston area via Highway 17-North
Follow signs to East I-526
Once on E-I-526, take #17 to I-26 East – towards Charleston
From I-26, take exit 219–B (Morrison Drive and East Bay Street ramp)
Turn left at the foot of the exit ramp
Cross over King Street and Meeting Street
After the crossovers, you will be on Morrison Drive / East Bay Street route
Stay on Morrison Drive / East Bay Street
Follow the large green highway signs and the smaller brown highway signs to Union Pier Terminal
Stay on East Bay Street, until you pass a U.S. Post Office on the right
From East Bay Street, turn left on to Chapel Street at the traffic light
Continue to follow the green highway signs and the brown highway signs to the Cruise Ship Terminal / Union Pier Terminal
Chapel Street will change name to Washington Street along the route
Turn left and Chapel/Washington Street onto Charlotte Street
At the intersection of Chapel/Washington and Charlotte Streets, there will be yellow A-frame signs in the roadway with directions for ‘Cruise Traffic’.
Follow the yellow signs. These will be in addition to the permanent street signs already noted.
The yellow A-frame signs will direct you to Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Union Pier Entry Gate #2 is at the intersection of Concord and Laurens
The Passenger Terminal is part of Union Pier
All general cruise traffic enters the area via Union Pier Entry Gate #2
Parking Information
 
Rates are subject to change
$17.00 per day - for standard vehicles up to 20 feet in length
$40.00 per day – for oversized vehicles over 20 feet in length (RV’s, Campers and busses)
A complimentary shuttle bus is provided between the vehicle storage areas and the Passenger Terminal on both departure and return dates of the cruise. The shuttles provide a comfortable way to arrive at the check-in location and return to the vehicle storage areas at the end of the cruise. Shuttles accessible for special needs and wheelchair assistance are also available.
 
Vehicle storage is available on port property, in a controlled access area available to cruise passengers – not the general public
The site is secured and patrolled by the Port Police during the cruise
Full payment due upon entering the parking area
Accepted forms of payment: U.S Dollars; Credit Cards; Traveler's Checks; Personal Checks. Personal checks should be made payable to: S.C. State Ports Authority; checks written on non-U.S banks and financial institutions are not accepted
A color-coded claim ticket and permit is given to the driver when payment is received. The larger permit should be displayed in the front window of the vehicle. The smaller claim ticket should be kept by the driver. It will help identify the storage area on the return date.
No advance reservations required
Parking for handicap accessible vehicles with valid permits, license plates and placards.

Things To See and Do
If you want to see a well-preserved "Southern belle" and breathe the atmosphere of the old South, Charleston is just the place. In 1773 Charleston was described as the wealthiest town in the American South. Today it retains, perhaps more than any other town in the southern states, the almost aristocratic ambiance of plantation society. A walk or a drive in a horse-drawn carriage through the Historic District, with its Georgian mansions fronted by verandas and its slender church towers, makes it easy to see why the heroine of "Gone with the Wind" preferred to live in Charleston. Tourism is now a major element in they city's economy, with attractions ranging from aquariums and museums to the USS Yorktown aircraft carrier and Fort Sumter.
 
Historic District
A walk or carriage ride through the Historic District feels like traveling back in time to the old days of Charleston. Magnificent historic homes, churches, and other structures line the streets. Area museums exhibit artifacts from families who once lived in the bustling port city, one of the country's founding towns. If ghosts and legends interest you, uncover Charleston's spookier side with haunted tours.
Location: Meeting and Market Streets, Charleston

South Carolina Aquarium
The South Carolina Aquarium isn't just home to underwater creatures. Birds, land-dwelling mammals, plants and reptiles also call the popular attraction home. Jellyfish, loggerhead sea turtles, and sharks greet visitors from a two-story, 385,000-gallon tank. And during daily interactive shows, divers also jump in to give visitors a wave. To get a feel for the behind-the-scenes animal care, visitors can take a tour of the aquarium's Sea Turtle Hospital - South Carolina's only hospital for sick and injured sea turtles. Address: 100 Aquarium Wharf, Charleston -- Official site: http://scaquarium.org/
 
Charleston Harbor Boat Tours
There are a variety of different boat tours available to take guests on a tour of Charleston Harbor. The trips take sightseers on a cruise past historic Fort Sumter, the massive Ravenel Bridge, and Patriots Point, where visitors can tour the USS Yorktown. Some companies also offer package deals that could combine a boat trip with local tourist attractions, carriage rides, or haunted walking tours.
 
Charleston Museum
Known as "America's First Museum," Charleston Museum was founded in 1773 under the Charleston Library Society and quickly began assembling its collections. Notable figures such as Thomas Heyward, Jr and John J Audubon participated in the early history of the museum. In 1852, Harvard scientist Louis Agassiz declared the collections to be among the finest in America. Address: 360 Meeting St, Charleston -- Official site: www.charlestonmuseum.org/

USS Yorktown & Patriots Point
Just across Charleston Harbor from the Historic District is Patriots Point, home to the USS Yorktown. This immense vessel was the tenth aircraft carrier to serve in the United States Navy, receiving the Presidential Unit Citation and earning 11 battle stars for service in World War II as well as five battle stars for service in Vietnam. She was also the vessel selected to recover the Apollo 8 astronauts, and even made a film debut in 1944's documentary "The Fighting Lady."
 
The Yorktown retired to Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum in 1975. Also at Patriots Point, visitors can tour aircraft, submarines, and other maritime exhibits. Address: 40 Patriots Point Rd, Mt Pleasant
Official site: www.patriotspoint.org

Waterfront Park
Boasting 12 acres of relaxing, waterfront property and an expansive view of Charleston Harbor, Waterfront Park is a favorite among tourists as well as locals. The old-fashioned park benches are favorites for enjoying a good book or watching sailboats (and sometimes large ships) cruise through the harbor. Visit at night to admire the unique Pineapple Fountain when it's lit up. Address: 1 Vendue, Charleston -- Official site: www.charlestonparksconservancy.org/our_parks/view_park/waterfront_park
 
King Street
Shoppers will feel right at home on King Street, Charleston's premier shopping district. The thoroughfare offers up designer brands, handcrafted jewelry, art galleries, bookstores, antiques dealers, and many other retail options. Varied dining spots also pack the street, serving everything from burgers to seafood. And if you're looking for an evening out, there are some entertainment options available too.
 
Fort Sumter National Monument
The American Civil War began on April 12, 1861 at Fort Sumter, when the Confederacy pummeled the federal fort in Charleston Harbor. The structure, along with other sites around Sullivan's Island, tell the story of Fort Sumter and how it helped shape the U.S. today. Visitors can catch a ride to the island from the Visitor Education Center located downtown at Liberty Square, or from Patriots Point. Address: 1214 Middle St, Sullivan's Island, Official site: www.nps.gov/fosu/index.htm

Boone Hall Plantation
According to NBC Daytime, Boone Hall Plantation is a must see for anyone visiting the Charleston area. Visitor's can stroll down the estate's signature Avenue of Oaks before taking in exhibits throughout the grounds. The plantation reflects the life of a southern plantation and black history in America. And since the Boone Hall Plantation is known as "America's Most Photographed Plantation," you will definitely want to have your camera ready for a multitude of photo opportunities.
Address: 1235 Long Point Rd, Mt Pleasant, Official site: www.boonehallplantation.com/

Magnolia Plantation
If gardens are your interest (or even if they're not), the beauty at Magnolia Plantation captures the attention of sightseers year-round. In addition, to a Biblical Garden and an Antebellum Cabin, this pre-Revolutionary War plantation features America's oldest gardens (circa 1680). There are many things to do on the grounds, with guided house tours, a nature train, boat tours, a black history exhibit, zoo, and nature center. For kids, the petting zoo is home to whitetail deer and pygmy goats. Address: 3550 Ashley River Rd, Charleston, Official site: www.magnoliaplantation.com

Drayton Hall
The elegant Drayton Hall is the oldest unrestored plantation house in America still open to the public. Similar to other local plantations, Drayton Hall offers guided house tours, nature walks, an African-American cemetery, and an interactive landscape tour. But where it differs is that the house itself (its walls, floors and fireplaces) remains virtually undisturbed, taking you back in time to yesteryear.
Address: 3380 Ashley River Rd, Charleston Official site: www.draytonhall.org/, 12 Middleton Place
 
Middleton Place
The elegant 65 acres at Middleton Place are home to America's oldest landscaped gardens. The grounds show off symmetrical, 17th century European design with sculpted terraces, parterres, and reflecting pools. Like Magnolia Plantation, the gardens at Middleton Place bloom year-round with rare camellias in the winter and azaleas in the spring. In the Plantation Stableyard, guests can find blacksmiths, potters, carpenters, and weavers working away to recreate the self-sufficient life of a Low Country plantation. Address: 4300 Ashley River Rd, Charleston, Official site: www.middletonplace.org/

Battery (White Point Gardens)
A seawall promenade, The Battery displays cannons and other war relics from Forts Moultrie and Sumter. White Point Gardens, established at the southern tip in 1837, became Battery Ramsey when the Civil War began. Address: 2 Murray Dr, Charleston
Official site: http://www.charlestonparksconservancy.org/our_parks/view_park/white_point_garden/

Historic Churches
Remarkable historic churches are scattered throughout Charleston, and each has an interesting past all its own. Among the city's most interesting are the brownstone Cathedral of St John the Baptist, St Michael's Episcopal Church dating to 1751, and a church that's home to oldest continuously active Huguenot congregation in the United States. Official site: http://www.charlestonsfinest.com/sc/historicchurches.htm

Historic Houses
Like its churches, all of Charleston's historic homes have a story. Many houses have artifacts available for viewing, allowing guests to peek into the past of a certain family or a long-gone way of life. Among the most notable historic homes are the Aiken-Rhett House (part of the Charleston Museum), the 1876 Calhoun Mansion, and the 1803 Joseph Manigault House that's furnished with 18th and 19th century pieces.
 
Old City Market:
Built in 1841, the city market features small shops, restaurants, and a flea market that extends along Market Street. You'll find everything here, from t-shirts and souvenirs to beautiful, hand-crafted sweetgrass baskets.

Charleston Ghost & Dungeon Tour:
The Charleston Ghost & Dungeon Tour. You actually go into the dungeon - very cool If you like scary and fun. Located Downtown Charleston 843-724-6262 www.charlestondungeon.com

The Beach:
If you prefer to relax on the beach you may visit and relax at the beach communities of Isle of Palms, Sullivan's Island, Folly Beach, and Kiawah Island. Beach facilities range from little more than an empty stretch of sand, to playgrounds, skate and bike rentals, shops, and restaurants.

The Dock Street Theatre
It was America's first theater and is situated at Church and Queen streets. The original building was constructed in 1736. The current structure is the remodeled one, the former Planters Hotel buit in the early 1800s. Historic forts are the most visited attractions in the Lowcountry area.
Fort Sumter is where the Civil War began. On April 12, 1861, after the first shot was fired and 34 hours of bloodless battle, it was surrendered and the Confederates held the fort for the next 27 months. Today, what remains of the fort is a national monument administered by the National Park Service. The fort houses a museum featuring exhibits of the fort's history.

Fort Moultrie
Another famous historic fort is Fort Moultrie, it was originally built in 1776 to guard the harbors. During the Civil War, it also defended the city. Charleston boasts many museum houses.

Calhoun Mansion
One of the more impressive historic houses is the Calhoun Mansion. Built in 1876, the house is one of a few remaining examples of Victorian palaces. This 25-room, 24,000-square-foot house features original tile floors and walnut, cherry, and oak woodwork, hand-painted gas chandeliers and a 45-foot-high ceiling ballroom.

Edmondston-Alston House The house displays family documents, portraits, silver pieces and furnishings, much of it dates back to the 1830s.

Aiken-Rhett House is another house museum that preserves some of Charleston's history remarkably intact. The original structure was built in 1817 as a typical Charleston single house and was altered twice; first in the bold Greek Revival and then the ornamented Rococo Revival style. At the rear of the house, restored slave quarters and outbuildings stand. For those who would like to learn about the history of slave and Gullah culture, visit some of the impressive plantations.

Drayton Hall
One of the prominent plantation houses, built in 1738, this 18th-century Georgian-Palladian dwelling is often regarded one of the most architecturally significant dwellings in America.

South Carolina Golf Club
Charleston was also the site of America's first golf course and golf club. In 1786 the South Carolina Golf Club was formed and established "Charleston Green" in what is now downtown Charleston. The city offers the golf enthusiast several golf courses that are world class.

Historic Charleston:
This is a narrated tour which focuses on the city's townhouses, mansions, churches, and educational institutions. Some tours may also include a visit to Boone Plantation for a glimpse of the workings of an antebellum plantation.

Charleston via Carriage Ride
If you are not big on walking the this is the tour for you. The horse drawn carriage ride takes you along the waterfront neighborhood known as the "Battery," and the nearby French Quarter, (known in the past as "Red Light District)."

Fort Sumter & Patriot's Point
After a brief bus ride and you transfer to a boat for a beautiful run across the harbor to Fort Sumter stands. The tour allows plenty time to roam the fort before you return to the mainland. A slight variation to the tour may include a stop at Patriot''s Point to see the Maritime Museum.

Harbor Tour:
If walking, carriaging or biking are not for you, try boating. An excellent way to stay cool in the humid weather is to tour the harbor by boat. It is a great way to appreciate the beauty of the city.

Carta
For travel within the Historic District, you'll find the Carta (Charleston Area Regional Transportation Authority) -operated trolleys the best bet. The trolleys (actually, rubber-tired buses that look like trolleys) travel various routes; one runs right by the Cruise Terminal. One-way fares (exact change required) are $1.00; one-day passes can be had for $3.00, a three-day pass for $7.00.

Eating Out
Foodies from all over flock to Charleston for some of the finest dining in the U.S. You get not only the refined cookery of the Lowcountry, but also an array of French and international specialties. The whole concept of “Lowcountry Cuisine” was pioneered here, essentially a blend of traditional Southern, African, French, and Caribbean flavors. Today, hot young chefs continue to experiment and open trendy new restaurants in the Historic District. One trend that unites the city’s culinary movers and shakers is farm-to-table: Charleston restaurateurs pride themselves on sourcing meat and produce locally, and seasonally. Though prices tend to be high, on a par with much bigger cities on the east and west coasts, the quality is hard to beat.
The City Market—a Good Food Guide
 
Charleston’s City Market at 188 Meeting St. is a great place to load up on (relatively cheap) local snacks and dishes. Eat here or take out to enjoy at Waterfront Park. Student favorite Caviar & Bananas (tel. 843/577-7757; www.caviarandbananas.com; daily 9am–6pm) is best known for its mouth-watering sandwiches (especially the duck confit and the po-boy), but the salads are also excellent, and there are plenty of gluten-free options. Food for the Southern Soul’s ‘Cue-Osk (tel. 843/577-5230; www.foodforthesouthernsoul.com; daily 9:30am–6pm) knocks out decent pulled pork ($6), beef brisket ($7), and mac and cheese ($2). Those with a sweet tooth have plenty of options. Southern Sisters (tel. 843/801-2665; www.southernsistersbakers.com) knocks out the famous Benne Wafer’s, Charleston lemon coolers, and pecan tea cookies, while nearby Kaminsky’s, 78 N. Market St. (tel. 843/853-8270; www.kaminskys.com) serves up ciders, coffees, hot toddies, and sumptuous desserts.
 
Shopping:
Charleston, where affluent British-educated Charlestonians once proudly decorated their homes in English style, boasts many fine antique shops with decidedly British taste. Charleston has long been a huge, vibrant antique market. In the early 1900s, a few antique dealers from New York discovered Charleston's quality English furnishings. Many of Charleston's old homes were built to show off fine antique furnishings. Auctions and estate sales are held regularly in Charleston, and some local dealers and buyers make regular buying trips to Europe. Ships that carry huge containers filled with early to mid 19th century English antiques arrive regularly in Charleston Harbor. Early furniture from Charleston is among the best of the pre-1830 furniture crafted in the U.S. One particular section along King Street, between Beaufain and Queen streets, is referred to as the Antique District, where you will find a high concentration of quality antique shops. If you are seriously considering buying one of them, make sure to talk to the storeowners, as there are often back rooms or upstairs galleries reserved for potential buyers. King Street has also been the heart of Charleston's shopping district for the past two hundred years. The densest and most appealing collection of upscale shops in the Carolinas is on King Street. The Shops at Belmond Charleston Place, located on the ground floor of Charleston Place Hotel, along King and Market streets (www.charlestonplace.com), comprises a mix of designer brands (Gucci, L’Occitane, Calypso St. Barth, Louis Vuitton, Kate Spade, and so on). A short stretch of trendy, youth-conscious boutiques known as Upper King Street Design District.
 
With its combination of sheer variety of shops and great walkability, Charleston is a great shopping destination. Along with national chains like J.Crew and American Apparel, King Street is home to dozens of local clothing stores. When Taylor Swift visited Charleston in 2011, she was spotted at Copper Penny, a local boutique famous for their shoes. Also on King Street, the popular Luna is a locals’ favorite for fashionistas, while the British-transplant Amanda Rosen has established her Butterfly Consignment Boutique as a constant temptation for women in the area. Around the corner at 57 Cannon Street, experience a true bit of Charleston style at Magar Hatworks, where Leigh Magar constructs handmade hats fit for a roaring ‘20s ball where everyone is dancing the Charleston.
 
For everything from souvenirs to clothing to benne wafers (a local cracker made from the seed of the benne grain), the newly renovated City Market is the obvious choice for shoppers. A healthy mix of table vendors and more permanent shops, the market can swallow an entire day with shopping bliss if you allow it to.
 
In between vendor rows at the market, Gullah women weave sweetgrass baskets in the fashion handed down generation after generation. These iconic Charleston souvenirs can cost a pretty penny, but they’re a beautiful reminder of your trip.






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