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London is really a fabulous city, having a wealthy heritage and history that greets you wherever you go. There's so much activity and sweetness working in London that multiple outings are generally a necessity to obtain a true feeling of the location. Possibly Samuel Manley was as soon as he stated, "a guy that's fed up with London is fed up with existence." The glory of Large Ben and also the splendor of a vacation to Buckingham Structure are a beginning. The British Museum is magnificent, and also the shopping within the city is spectacular. The city doesn't exude an ‘in your face’ buzz but totally charms with its cosmopolitan aura, and quintessential, subtle British vibe.
 
Present-day London still offers an aura from the medieval, which only contributes to its charm. St. Paul's Cathedral, that has was because the 1600s, is really a glorious site. The Thames flows by on a single course because it did two 1000 years back, and London's time machine museums are magnificent. Art, fashion, and dining working in london remain popular, as well as attempts to imitate the gown and music of Britain's hot place. London continues to be a swinging city, and Vanity Fair lately announced it the best city on the planet.
 
But whatever you traditionalists don't dismay, for British people possess a strong feeling of culture and tradition. Teatime continues to be most sacred area of the day, which is honored by virtually every citizen in the area. The tall, red-colored double-decker buses still tour the town, and also the matching red-colored telephone cubicles can nonetheless be available on virtually every corner. Not to mention, the Royal Family continues its very own tradition in England. Going for a tour from the Royal Quarters, gallivanting round the area, and exploring all London's sights first-hands are unequalled encounters.
 
There's a lot adventure found in London, however it takes a little of effort. Design from the area is very hard to navigate, however this simply increases the fun! Going round the city and finding unique encounters is the greatest factor about London. It's made especially enjoyable because London is among the most secure metropolitan areas on the planet, so you'll be secure and comfy in most of the travels. It's the swirling maze of roads and also the city's medieval arrangements which make London hard to travel from indicate point. Consequently, you'll finish up taking roundabout directions from local people, experiencing wonderfully eccentric people and encounters on the way.
 
Docking & Local Transportation
Cruise ships will typically pier close to the Strait of Dover within the Isle of Sheppey. The Dover Cruise terminals are about 75 miles (120 kms) from Central London. It is one of three ports used by cruise ships visiting the London area. The others are Southampton and Harwich,  both a similar distance from London than Dover. 

Dover is most commonly a port of embarkation and/or debarkation (itineraries can vary, from those that head to the Baltics and Northern Europe to those cruising south, to the Mediterranean), and most cruise passengers who want extra time in England will use London as their base instead. London is about a 1 1/2-hour train ride or two-hour drive away. Came from here you are able to have a taxi or bus into London, situated 80 miles from port. The thrill of traveling in to the city never wanes, regardless of the number of occasions you have carried out it before.
 
Traveling by bus is usually a good choice working in London, because both citizens and vacationers discover the bus system reliable and safe. Single-day travel cards could be bought, supplying bus access working in London for the whole day. These will typically cost around $5.00. The Subterranean System, referred to as "The Tube", is easily the most broadly utilized way of transportation working in London. You will find twelve fundamental lines, each having a distinctive title, so make sure and complement your destination using the proper subterranean line. The Tube may take you directly where you need to go inside the city.
 
No shuttle buses are provided between the cruise and the train station or London bus stops at Dover. You therefore need to get a taxi between the cruise terminal and the train station/bus stop. The fare should be around £8.
Taxi cabs at Dover come in a wide range of sizes and shapes, the image tight is fairly typical. If you have two cases per person and more than 2 people you may end up with multiple taxi cabs.

Its just a 5 minute drive between the cruise terminals at Dover to/from the railway and bus stations and ferry terminal.The cruise terminals are far too far to walk with luggage from the train stations.The taxi rank at the cruise terminal is well marshalled. Porters from the ship will normally take your luggage as far as the taxi rank immediately outside the front doors of the cruise terminal. It is customary to leave a small tip with cab drivers, (assuming they provide a good service).
 
Local Interests
Large Ben isn't just probably the most impressive clock in the whole world. It's an historic landmark plus an important bit of architecture. Situated in Parliament Square, Large Ben is really a truly amazing edifice. Its seven-hundred-pound pendulum keeps wonderful time. The time tower adjoins the homes of Parliament, and whenever home of Commons is within session, an easy stands out over the clock face.
 
The British Museum may be the premier museum working in London (and also the world, for your matter) and it is a remarkable tourist attraction. Mixing amazing architecture with incredible exhibits and shows, the British Museum is really a world-class establishment.
 
The Nation's Maritime Museum is a superb spot to learn by pointing out British as well as their ancestral relationship using the ocean. Motorboats, artistic representations, and items from wars and shipwrecks are some of the fascinating features only at that wonderful site. Situated on Romney Road, the nation's Maritime is unlike any museum you have ever seen.
 
On Tower Hill stands the Tower based in London, an infamous and impressive destination. The Tower based in London has represented seven-hundred many was utilized in medieval occasions like a prison and execution center. Today it's a wonderful historic site along with a great attraction. The led tours are intriguing and strikingly eerie, causeing this to be turreted marvel essential.
 
While you gaze upon the Tower Bridge, you're going to get a feeling of how much of an unbelievable work of workmanship and architectural genius it's. Situated at Tower Hill, the Tower is exquisitely ornate. The infrastructure is really as complex because it is extravagant, and also the Tower Bridge is undoubtedly probably the most visited bridges in the whole world.
 
The Royal Botanic Gardens, situated on Kew Road, feature 3 hundred acres of garden and also over 60 1000 types of plants. Two royal ladies, Full Caroline and Princess Augusta, founded the Gardens within the 1700s. The 1800s green-houses and also the condition-of-the-art Princess of Wales Conservatory are two of the most beloved points of interest.
 
Westminster Abbey is situated at Broad Sanctuary and is easily the most famous chapel in great britan. An uplifting illustration of Medieval and British architecture, the abbey is how a lot of the nobleman and queens of England were crowned and also the funeral place of British royalty and notable figures through the centuries. It had been founded in 1065, and also the chapel is available to the general public Mondays through Fridays, 9am to 4pm, and Saturdays from 9am to 2pm.
 
Attractions
 
Buckingham Structure
This magnificent site at Buckingham Structure Rd. continues to be the state home from the Royal family since 1837. The Dukes of Buckingham first possessed the structure, and Full Victoria's numerous makeovers throughout her reign greatly enhanced the appearance and structure from the royal home. Every single day throughout the summer time, and every second day throughout the wintertime, you'll be treated around the world-famous Altering from the Guard ceremony. The wedding is essential for anybody going to London.
 
Outside Sports
Britain is traversed by 100s of miles of rivers and historic waterways, making London and also the surrounding areas fabulous for boating. There's a multitude of seagoing ships to select from, varying in the most fundamental of narrow motorboats to luxurious barges.
 
The Tower of London
From prison to palace, treasure vault to private zoo, the magnificent Tower of London has fulfilled many different roles down the centuries. One of Britain's most iconic structures, this spectacular World Heritage Site offers many hours of fun and fascination for visitors curious about the country's rich history - after all, so much of it happened here. The massive White Tower, built in 1078 by William the Conqueror, victor of the famous Battle of Hastings, dominates the 18-acre property and is home to the world's oldest visitor attraction, the amazing 17th century Line of Kings with its remarkable displays of royal armaments and armor. Other highlights include the famous Crown Jewels exhibition, the Beefeaters, the Royal Mint, and gruesome exhibits about the executions that took place on the grounds.
 
Trafalgar Square and Nelson's Column
Trafalgar Square is one of London's best-known tourist spots. Built to commemorate Lord Horatio Nelson's victory over the French and Spanish at Trafalgar in 1805, its most notable feature is Nelson's Column. Constructed entirely from granite, this 185 ft high monument overlooks the square's fountains and bronze reliefs, cast from French cannons and depicting England's greatest victories at Cape St Vincent, the Nile, Copenhagen and Trafalgar. Circling Trafalgar Square are numerous other interesting attractions, including the imposing Admiralty Arch, St Martin-in-the-Fields (the royal parish church), the superb National Gallery with its valuable painting collection, and the Whitehall area, home to the Houses of Parliament.
 
St Paul's Cathedral
The largest and most famous of London's many churches - and undoubtedly one of the most spectacular cathedral's in the world - St Paul's Cathedral sits atop the site of a Roman temple. The previous church structure was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666, and Sir Christopher Wren designed the re-build. Today, the twin Baroque towers and magnificent 365 ft dome of St Paul's are a masterpiece of English architecture. If you're up to it, be sure to walk the stairs with their spectacular views of the dome's interior, including the Whispering Gallery.
 
The London Eye
Built to mark London's millennium celebrations in 2000, the London Eye is Europe's largest observation wheel. Its individual glass capsules offer the most spectacular views of the city as you embark on a circular tour rising 443 ft above the Thames. The journey lasts 30-minutes, often quicker than the time spent queuing for your turn. If you can, reserve your time in advance. Hours: Daily, 10am-8:30pm Admission: From £29.50 (online discounts available) Address: Riverside Building, County Hall, Westminster Bridge Rd, London -- Official site: www.londoneye.com
 
Buckingham Palace
One of Britain's most iconic buildings, Buckingham Palace was built in 1837 and has been the London residence of the Royal Family since Queen Victoria's accession time. If you're wondering whether the Queen's in, take a peek at the flagpole atop the building: if the royal standard is flying day and night, she's at home. On special state occasions she and members of the Royal Family may even put in an appearance on the central balcony. When she's away at her summer palace in Scotland, visitors can purchase tickets for tours of the State Rooms, the Queen's Gallery and the Royal Mews (from £34.50), while the wonderful Changing of the Guard ceremony can be seen most days at 11.30am (free).
 
Westminster Abbey
 Another location with a long association with British royalty, Westminster Abbey stands on a site that's been associated with Christianity since the early 7th century. Officially known as the Collegiate Church of St Peter in Westminster, Westminster Abbey was founded by Edward the Confessor in 1065 as his place of interment. From his burial in 1066 until that of George II almost 700 years later, most sovereigns were not only crowned here but they were buried here too. More recently, it's become famous as the preferred location for Royal Weddings.
 
Covent Garden
The always-bustling area known as Covent Garden centers on the Market, with its excellent specialty shops, fashion boutiques, craft stalls and cafés. Covent Garden also includes Long Acre (the main thoroughfare), the retail areas of Neal's Yard and Seven Dials, and the Central Square with its street performers. Other landmarks are the Royal Opera House and St Paul's Church. Dating from 1633, the church is often referred to as the Actors' Church as it contains the graves of many 18th and 19th century actors. Other nearby cultural venues are the London Coliseum, home to the English National Opera Company, and Theatre Royal Drury Lane, the world's oldest theater.
 
Hampton Court Palace
Another great Thames-side attraction, Hampton Court is one of Europe's most famous palaces. Its Great Hall dates from Henry VIII's time (two of his six wives supposedly haunt the palace), and it's where Elizabeth I learned of the defeat of the Spanish Armada. Other interesting features include the Clock Court with its fascinating astronomical clock dating from 1540, the State Apartments with their Haunted Gallery, the Chapel, the King's Apartments and the Tudor tennis court. The gardens are also worth visiting - especially in mid-May when in full bloom - and include the Privy Garden, the Pond Garden, the Elizabethan Knot Garden, the Broad Walk, an area known as the Wilderness and, of course, the palace's famous Maze.
 
Greenwich - Home of Britain's Seafaring History
Greenwich is a highlight of any visit to London. For centuries the hub of Britain's naval power, the area boasts numerous attractions and can take hours, if not days, to explore properly. First stop should be the Cutty Sark, the last of the 19th century tea clippers that once sailed between Britain and China, the fastest ship of its day. The ship is located adjacent to the Old Royal Naval College, the Discover Greenwich Visitor Centre with its exhibits showcasing over 500 years of maritime history, and the Palladian mansion known as Queen's House.
 
There's also the impressive collection of the National Maritime Museum, the largest of its kind in the world and illustrating the history of the Royal Navy from Tudor and Stuart times to the Napoleonic Wars. Afterwards, take a stroll around the 183-acre Greenwich Park, the oldest of London's eight Royal Parks with its many beautiful gardens and walking paths.
 
Hyde Park
Covering 350 acres, Hyde Park is London's largest open space and has been a destination for sightseers since 1635. One of the park's highlights is the Serpentine, an 18th century man-made lake popular for boating and swimming. Hyde Park is also where you'll find Speakers' Corner, a traditional forum for free speech (and heckling). Another Hyde Park landmark is Apsley House, former home of the first Duke of Wellington and purchased after his famous victory at Waterloo. Now a museum, it houses Wellington's magnificent collections of paintings, including Velázquez's Waterseller of Seville, along with gifts presented by grateful European kings and emperors. England's greatest hero is also commemorated at the Wellington Arch.
 
The Victoria and Albert Museum
The Victoria and Albert Museum (aka the V&A) is part of a South Kensington-based group of museums that includes the Natural History Museum and Science Museum. Founded in 1852, the V&A covers close to 13 acres and contains 145 galleries spanning some 5,000 years of art and related artifacts. Exhibits include ceramics and glass, textiles and costumes, silver and jewelry, ironwork, sculpture, prints and photos.
 
Whitehall and Parliament
Stretching from Trafalgar Square towards the seat of power in Parliament Square, Whitehall - named after the road - has for centuries referred to an area synonymous with the British Government. As you walk up Whitehall, you'll pass important buildings such as the Admiralty, the famous Horse Guards with its horse-mounted soldiers, and past the little cul-de-sac with the famous name of Downing Street. There, No 10 is the official residence of the Prime Minister.
 
Finally, you'll reach the Houses of Parliament, seat of Britain's government for many centuries and once the site of a royal palace (Westminster Palace) occupied by William the Conqueror. Tours of the parliament buildings are available, and offer a unique chance to see debates and other lively political discussions taking place. Also of interest are the Cabinet War Rooms used by Winston Churchill in WWII.
 
The Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew
 Kew Gardens - officially called the Royal Botanic Gardens - is situated in southwest London on the south bank of the Thames and is a wonderful place to spend time as you enjoy the numerous plants grown amidst its 300-acres. Laid out in 1759, the gardens became government property in 1841. In 1897 Queen Victoria added Queen's Cottage and the adjoining woodland. A variety of tours are available free with admission, and many musical and cultural events are held here throughout the year.
 
The Two Tates: Tate Britain and Tate Modern
Once collectively known as the Tate Gallery, London's two Tate galleries - Tate Britain and Tate Modern - comprise one of the world's 's most important art collections. Opened in 1897 as the basis of a national collection of significant British art, the gallery continued to make acquisitions and needed more space to properly display its collections. The end result was the establishment of Tate Britain in Millbank on the north side of the Thames as home to its permanent collection of historic British paintings. A superbly transformed power station across the Thames became home to the modern art collections. Art lovers can spend whole day viewing both sites, conveniently connected by high-speed ferry.
 
Dining and Night life
Le Caprice instructions probably the most loyalty in most based in London. The meals, atmosphere, and repair are perfect, and also the wine list, while pricey, is exquisite. The setup from the restaurant gives itself towards the best watching people around, but your meals are so wonderful that you simply will not be too depressed by the passersby. The crispy duck and grilled rabbit are exotic special treats which will amaze your tastebuds. Le Caprice (020/7629-2239) is situated on Arlington St., SW1. Momo is really a Moroccan restaurant that impresses 100s of patrons every single day. Probably the most popular dining facilities in most of effective Britain, Momo (020/7434-4040) are situated at 25 Heddon St., W1. Bookings are crucial, and also the live music is definitely incredibly entertaining.
 
The Comedy Store is a well-liked nightspot where you stand certain to laugh. This factory of improv is a superb spot to spend a night following a day's touring and sightseeing (1A Oxendon St., 0870/060-2340). Mind towards the Library (020/7259-5599), situated at 1 Lanesborough Pl., for many terrific mixed drinks along with a lively crowd as well.
 
West End and Central London Texture, Portman Place -- Icelandic cuisine doesn’t necessarily spring to mind when you think of high-end London dining experiences– or not until Agnar Sverrisson and Xavier Rousset, protégés of Raymond Blanc, set up Texture in 2007 and won a Michelin star in 2010. Searingly fresh ingredients, both British and Icelandic, with lots of fish and herbs, sit alongside a phenomenal wine list (Rousset is the sommelier). Lunch menus £19.90 for two courses and £24.90 for three. Tasting menus from £79 (per person, for the whole table). Location: 34 Portman Street, London W1.Contact: 020 7224 0028, www.texture-restaurant.co.uk
 
Galvin at Windows, Park Lane -- Chef Patron Chris Galvin’s baby opened in 2006 on the 28th floor of the Hilton Hotel on Park Lane, with staggering views of Hyde Park and the capital. Its excellent modern French haute cuisine – gorgeously rich but with little nods to Asia and Britain - recently earned a Michelin star: altogether a very glamorous night out. Lunch menus from £25. Location: Park Lane, W1, between Hyde Park and Mayfair. Classy.Contact: 020 7208 4021, www.galvinatwindows.com
Dinner by Heston Blumenthal -- This light-filled restaurant at the Mandarin Oriental grabbed headlines for its reinterpreted historic British dishes, from 18th-century Salmagundy (chicken, salsify, marrow bone) to Taffety Tart (apple, rose, fennel and blackcurrant sorbet). Go: the food is delicious, the stories fascinating, the service charming - and the views over Hyde Park aren’t bad, either. Contact: 020 7201 3833, www.dinnerbyheston.com
 
The Wolseley, Piccadilly never lets you down; if you can get in, that is. It calls itself a café “in the Grand European tradition” and the glamour comes from the buzzing crowd and its setting in an Art Deco former car showroom. The food is perfect for hangover breakfasts, business lunches or taking your parents out. After all these years it still manages to be an event. Location: 160 Piccadilly, W1, ideal for Mayfair and St James’s. Contact: 020 7499 6996, www.thewolseley.com. Wild Honey, off Hanover Square
 
This tiny restaurant just opposite St George’s Hanover Square serves thoughtful seasonal food - try the delicious rabbit pork and apricot terrine - and has a wine list so impressive you wonder where they keep it all. Three-course set lunches £21.95, pre-theatre three courses £22.95.
Location: 12 St George Street, W1, in the heart of Mayfair. Contact: 020 7758 9160, www.wildhoneyrestaurant.co.uk
 
Coq d’Argent -- Restaurateurs D&D know their market and this rooftop restaurant, bar and brasserie on top of James Stirling’s pink-and-terracotta striped building, No 1 Poultry (you can’t miss it; it looks like a Frazzle) does classic French food during the week, but relaxes with jazz and brunch at weekends. It’s a treat being up above the City with stonking views. Top marks too for the £28 Sunday Jazz Lunch. Location: No 1 Poultry, EC2 Contact: 020 7395 5000, www.coqdargent.co.uk
 
Blueprint Café sitting above the Design Museum with a panoramic view over the Thames just east of Tower Bridge, the Blueprint has been satisfying its customers for over 21 years. The style is simple with bentwood chairs, white walls and a wholesome British menu - you even get a little pair of blue binoculars for looking at the sights (or your fellow guests). This is a good place for a lunch combined with a long riverside walk, or for a leisurely dinner on a warm summer night.
Address: Design Museum, 28 Butler's Wharf, Shad Thames, London SE1 2YD. Contact: 020 7378 7031; www.blueprintcafe.co.uk.
 
 
Shopping
Antiquairius is the greatest store to locate antiques and niche products. It's situated at 131-141 King's Rd., and it is a wonderful indoor shopping experience (020/7969-1500). Selfridges is London's biggest mall, and it is situated at 400 Oxford Street. Finally, no London shopping experience could be complete without a visit to the renowned Harrods mall. Situated at 87-135 Brompton Rd., Harrods is just wonderful, featuring beautiful women's and men's clothing, an incredible food court, exquisite jewelry, and a whole lot of other goodies.
 
London has several distinct retail districts and shopping streets, many of which have their own themes or specialities. From luxury goods in Mayfair to quirky finds in Covent Garden, to large shopping centres like Westfield, you can easily while away an hour, an afternoon or a whole day shopping in London. Here's our guide to London's top shopping areas.
Oxford Street
The heart of London shopping, bustling Oxford Street has more than 300 shops, designer outlets and landmark stores. Home to the legendary Selfridges, it also boasts a range of famous department stores such as John Lewis and Debenhams scattered among every well-known high street chain imaginable. Get off the beaten track by slipping into a side street, such as St Christopher's Place and Berwick Street, where you'll find some real treats.
Nearest tube: Oxford Circus, Bond Street or Tottenham Court Road
 
Regent Street and Jermyn Street -- An impressively elegant shopping street, Regent Street offers a good range of mid-priced fashion stores alongside some of the city's oldest and most famous shops, including Hamleys, Liberty and The Apple Store. Nearby, historic Jermyn Street is renowned for men's clothing shops and is so typically British it's enough to bring out the old-fashioned gent in anyone! Jermyn Street is particularly well known for its bespoke shirt makers such as Benson & Clegg and shoe shops including John Lobb.
Nearest Tube: Piccadilly Circus or Oxford Circus
 
Bond Street and Mayfair -- Whether you've got money to burn and want to splash out on the very best in designer clothes, or just love luxury window shopping, Bond Street and Mayfair are the ideal places to go for some extravagant retail therapy. Popular with celebrities on a spree, this is probably London's most exclusive shopping area, home to big names, including Burberry, Louis Vuitton and Tiffany & Co. Neighbouring South Molton Street boasts iconic fashion store, Browns.
Nearest Tube: Bond Street or Piccadilly Circus
 
Westfield has two major shopping malls in London at White City and Stratford. Westfield London is home to high street favourites including Debenhams, Next, Marks & Spencer and House of Fraser, along with luxury brands, such as Louis Vuitton, Jimmy Choo, All Saints and Ted Baker. There's also a cinema, gym, several bars and restaurants, all under one roof! If you're a fan of shopping centres, don't miss Westfield Stratford City in East London, which boasts 250 shops plus 70 places to dine, making it the largest shopping mall in Europe.
Nearest tube: White City or Shepherds Bush for Westfield London, and Stratford for Westfield Stratford City.
Carnaby Street -- The birthplace of the fashion and cultural revolution during the Swinging 60s, Carnaby Street and the 13 surrounding streets are two minutes away from Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus and feature more than 150 brands and over 50 independent restaurants and bars. Step under the iconic arch and you'll find an intriguing mix of stores as well as independent boutiques, heritage brands, and new designer names, as well as a choice of restaurants, bars, cafés and great English pubs will real ale, and real history. Refuel at restaurant hub Kingly Court, just off Carnaby Street.
Nearest Tube: Oxford Circus or Piccadilly Circus
 
Covent Garden -- Whether you want hip fashion, unique gifts, rare sweets or one-off handmade jewellery, Covent Garden is a great place to explore. You can stock up on the latest urban streetwear, funky cosmetics and shoes on Neal Street, check out imaginative arts and crafts at Covent Garden Market or just window shop around the stores. Don't miss Floral Street, Monmouth Street, St Martin's Courtyard, Shorts Gardens, Seven Dials and picture-pretty Neal's Yard for a true taste of London's most distinctive shopping area.
Nearest Tube: Covent Garden or Leicester Square
 
King's Road -- Shopping is the King's Road's main obsession – here you'll find an eclectic mix of trendy boutiques, unique labels, designer shops and high-street staples, alongside a vast array of cafes and eateries. It's also a great place for inspirational interior design, with Peter Jones, Heal's and Cath Kidston all vying for attention. Be sure to check out the store where punk was born in the 70s, Vivienne Westwood's shop and the treasure trove of antiques at the Chelsea Antiques Market.
Nearest Tube: Sloane Square
 
Knightsbridge -- Visitors from around the world flock to Knightsbridge and Brompton Road to visit the illustrious shops and department stores. This is the place to go if you're looking for prestigious brands and up-to-the-minute trends from the world's fashion elite. Best known for Harrods and Harvey Nichols, you'll also find a whole host of big-name fashion designers on Sloane Street. Showing Knightsbridge caters to all tastes,  there's a branch of Topshop opposite Harrods. 
Nearest Tube: Knightsbridge
 
Savile Row -- Known worldwide as the home of bespoke British tailoring, Savile Row is the place to come if you want a handmade suit crafted the old-fashioned way (with a price tag to match). Credited with inventing the tuxedo Henry Poole & Co – also the first Savile Row tailor – is still cutting cloth at No 15. Other big names include Gieves & Hawkes, Huntsman & Sons and Ozwald Boateng. On the corner of this "golden mile" of tailoring you'll also find the flagship Abercrombie & Fitch store.
Nearest Tube: Bond Street or Piccadilly Circus
Notting Hill -- Famous worldwide thanks to the film of the same name, Notting Hill offers a vast array of small, unique shops selling unusual and vintage clothing, rare antiques, quirky gifts, books and organic food. There's also the unmissable Portobello Road Market – a mile-long (1.6km) street with a vibrant array of different stalls set out daily. Nearby Westbourne Grove offers more high-end shopping, with stylish designer shops dotted between a mix of quirky boho boutiques, hip cafes and art galleries.
Nearest Tube: Notting Hill Gate, Ladbroke Grove or Westbourne Park
 
Canary Wharf -- Canada Square, in London's Docklands, is home to many of the UK's leading businesses, but it also has a great shopping centre, open seven days a week. Sleek and modern, Canada Square boasts more than 200 shops, with all the major high-street chains as well as a good selection of designer stores. Look out for big names like Oasis and Zara plus lingerie brand Myla and luxurious fragrance store Jo Malone. If you can avoid the weekday lunch-hour rush, it's one of London's most chilled-out shopping experiences.
Nearest Tube: Canary Wharf
 
Boxpark -- Based in the heart of East London, Boxpark Shoreditch is the world's first pop-up mall and the home of the pop-up store. Opened in 2011 by founder and CEO Roger Wade, the mall will be open for the next four years. Constructed of stripped and refitted shipping containers, Boxpark is filled with a mix of fashion and lifestyle brands, galleries, cafés and restaurants. Nearest Tube: Old Street and Liverpool Street.



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