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Port Stanley is the capital of the Falkland Islands. It is located on the island of East Falkland, on a north-facing slope in one of the wettest parts of the island.
Most of the people with any awareness of the Falkland Islands are either British or Argentine and Old enough to remember the Falklands War of 1982. Argentina has always claimed the islands should belong to it, despite the fact they were claimed by Britain in the 1830s - before modern Argentina was technically founded. Rockhopper Exploration, which carried out test drilling in the waters around the islands, said in September it had made significant finds and could begin pumping by 2016.
Britain has around 1,200 service personnel on the islands, and there are three Royal Navy warships in the area along with four RAF Typhoon fighter bombers.
 
The islands (East Falkland and West Falkland) are so remote that they are easily overlooked except for the above reasons. Sparsely populated, windswept, boggy and treeless, they are geographically part of Patagonia but are located about 300 miles off the coast of Argentina. In fact, Argentina considers the Falklands (what they call the Malvinas) theirs and waged a war in 1982 to claim them (they've been under British rule since the mid-1800's). The war lasted 74 days, the Argentines were defeated and the islands remain resolutely British.
 
Stanley, the capital city of the Falklands, is located on East Falkland and is the only "town" in the islands. The entire population of the Falklands is 2,500, with 1,700 calling Stanley home.
 
The area is so windswept and the seas around it so fierce that only about half of the cruise ships scheduled to call at Port Stanley actually make it. Since there is no dock, even if the ships themselves can get into the harbor, the tenders are often unable to handle the wind and high seas. It's no great surprise, then, to discover that the harbor itself and the areas surrounding it has more shipwrecks from the 19th-century shipping trade than any other harbor in the world ... some 20 hulls are actually visible from the town when the tide is out.
 
Anyone lucky enough to have fair seas and the ability to arrive in Stanley Harbor is immediately struck by the view of the colorful corrugated metal roofs of the town's structures, which are visible from the ship. Stanley's main street follows the waterfront; the town rises somewhat behind it. There are no traffic lights, no department stores, no movie theaters or bowling alleys. Everyone knows everyone else and is more than likely related in one way or another to every other person on the islands.
 
What's most striking about visiting Stanley is that the residents are cheerful, happy, helpful and really glad to see you. Stop for a drink in one of the pubs in the town and strike up a conversation with a local; see for yourself how genuinely glad they are that you're visiting.
 
The islands (East Falkland and West Falkland) are so remote that they are easily overlooked except for the above reasons. Sparsely populated, windswept, boggy and treeless, they are geographically part of Patagonia but are located about 300 miles off the coast of Argentina. In fact, Argentina considers the Falklands (what they call the Malvinas) theirs and waged a war in 1982 to claim them (they've been under British rule since the mid-1800's). The war lasted 74 days, the Argentines were defeated and the islands remain resolutely British.
 
Stanley, the capital city of the Falklands, is located on East Falkland and is the only "town" in the islands. The entire population of the Falklands is 2,500, with 1,700 calling Stanley home.
 
The area is so windswept and the seas around it so fierce that only about half of the cruise ships scheduled to call at Port Stanley actually make it. Since there is no dock, even if the ships themselves can get into the harbor, the tenders are often unable to handle the wind and high seas. It's no great surprise, then, to discover that the harbor itself and the areas surrounding it has more shipwrecks from the 19th-century shipping trade than any other harbor in the world ... some 20 hulls are actually visible from the town when the tide is out.
 
Anyone lucky enough to have fair seas and the ability to arrive in Stanley Harbor is immediately struck by the view of the colorful corrugated metal roofs of the town's structures, which are visible from the ship. Stanley's main street follows the waterfront; the town rises somewhat behind it. There are no traffic lights, no department stores, no movie theaters or bowling alleys. Everyone knows everyone else and is more than likely related in one way or another to every other person on the islands.
 
What's most striking about visiting Stanley is that the residents are cheerful, happy, helpful and really glad to see you. Stop for a drink in one of the pubs in the town and strike up a conversation with a local; see for yourself how genuinely glad they are that you're visiting.
 
Where You're Docked
Ships anchor in Falkland Sound and passengers are tenders arrive at the Jetty, in the center of town and just across the street from the Visitor's Centre. It takes about 20 -25 minutes to reach the pier by tender. Most large cruise ships will dock near the center of town and allow passengers time to roam the city and possibly take trips by vehicle to nearby wildlife sites.
 
The Visitor's Centre is directly across from the tender dock; inside are international telephones and Internet stations, as well as maps and access to island tours. There are also several shops within a few steps of the dock, and a pub, the Globe Tavern, located less than a block away.
 
Getting Around
The areas around Stanley that you'd want to visit are all within a few short blocks of each other and easily walkable. There is a rise as you travel away from the waterfront, but it isn't steep and can be maneuvered by wheelchairs.
 
Note: The town is relatively accessible, but the tenders may not be. Even on the best of days the seas are rough, and although the dock is easy for most to negotiate, wheelchair-bound guests may have a real problem getting off the ship and back on.
 
By walking[
Since Stanley is a small town, so walking is probably the best option for seeing the sights.
By taxi
There are two taxi services operating within Stanley that service the town and the surrounding area.
Bonners Taxis, Tel: 51126
Town Taxis, Tel: 52900
 
The only excursion that some ships offer is a city tour and many cruise ships offer no excursions at this port. Available tours and activities are limited at this port of call, as are taxis. It is, however, very easy to see most of the islands worthwhile sites on a short walking tour. Stop at the tourist station at the pier for a town map and follow the Stanley Harbour Maritime History Trail. Information panels document the shipwrecks that surround Port Stanley. As you walk along the harbor, don’t miss the opportunity to catch a glimpse of the black-browed albatross, giant petrels and steamer ducks that inhabit the port in summer.
 
Watch Out For
Dress in layers for a visit here, and bring a waterproof jacket or an umbrella. The weather is fairly unpredictable, although you can almost always count on wind.
 
Things to See
 
Bluff Cove and/or Gentoo Penguin
Penguins! Any opportunity to go on an excursion that includes penguins is a not-to-be-missed adventure. The Falklands are home primarily to Gentoo penguins, but there are a few colonies that include King and Magellenic penguins as well. Tours can be purchased at the Visitor's Centre across from the Jetty (the tender dock) or onboard; the off-road 4-WD trip to Bluff Cove is only available as a shore excursion.
 
The tiny inlet of Bluff Cove features a Falkland Island museum as well as a privately owned wildlife haven, where you can get up close and personal with hundreds of playful Gentoo penguins.
 
Rockhopper Penguin Colony
The Falkland Islands have some of the largest rockhopper penguin colonies in the world. So unaffected by the presence of humans, you can stand by and watch them hop down to the sea for food.
 
Volunteer Point
Volunteer Point is home to the largest population of king penguins in the Falklands, with a range of low cliffs and sandy and boulder beaches with extensive off shore kelp beds.
 
Historic Dockyard Museum
A set of buildings with themed exhibition areas containing a notable collection of historic and maritime relics including displays from the Falklands War. Britannia House Museum: Historic artifacts from the maritime history of the region are but a small part of this museum's attractions, since life on the islands is represented here by way of donations from the residents. It's almost a living memoir of the past and the present, and features a low-key exhibit on the 1982 conflict.
 
Christchurch Cathedral/Whalebone Arch
With a renowned monument constructed by giant blue whale jawbones on its grounds, this turn-of-the-century Anglican cathedral built from stone and brick is a National Treasure. Its whalebone arch welcomes visitors to the southernmost cathedral in the world. The church was built in the 1890's and the whalebone arch was a gift from South Georgia to the Falklands in 1933 as part of the centennial celebration of British rule. The cathedral comes under the governance of the Archbishop of Canterbury and is Anglican.
 
Battlefield Sites Battlefield Sites
Throughout the island is evidence of the Falkland Islands' 1982 war with Argentina including man-made bunkers, fox holes, discarded clothing, unused munitions, and still-active and clearly marked land mines in the countryside.
 
Long Island Farm Long Island Farm
Neil and Glenda Watson are sixth-generation Islanders who continue to farm their 22,000-acre property in traditional Falkland style. Penguins, dolphins and whales also call this area home.
 
Nature Trek Nature Trek
The east end of Stanley Harbor is home to a diverse array of flora and fauna, including colonies of penguins, sea lions, albatross, ferns, grasses and the national flower, delicate pale maidens.
 
Been There, Done That
If you've been there and done that in Stanley, you've done almost all there is to do. Still, there are a few options for those who might want something out of the ordinary:
 
Cape Pembroke Birding Walk: This is a half-day walk that takes you to a restored 19th-century lighthouse and introduces you to the many bird species that call the Falklands home, including albatross, grebes, hawks, petrels, Magellenic snipe, Falkland pipit and peregrine falcons. You can learn about it and get a map at the Visitor's Centre.
 
Sea Trout Fishing: The introduction 50 years ago of "salmo trutta" into the waters of the Falklands has created a game-fishing bonanza for this eerily beautiful landscape. If the weather isn't too frigid and if the winds aren't howling, a day spent in one of the remote estuaries can be beyond peaceful. Locals are allowed to keep up to six fish a day, and since ships don't allow you to bring your catch onboard, a barbless-hook-catch-and-release program works for visitors. Check www.visitorfalklands.com for more information.
 
Shore Excursions
Bluff Cove Penguin Rookery: This excursion is only available via the cruise ship's excursion desk since it's an off-road excursion using 4-WD vehicles, which are reserved in advance. Not for the faint of heart, the vehicles go up and down over roadless bogs and through a lagoon to get to Bluff Cove on the beach. Gentoo and King penguins are people-friendly and curious (no touching, though); a little hut provides tea, coffee, cookies and cakes. The scenery is unbelievably beautiful.
 
Maritime Mystery Tour: Take a small boat around the harbor and learn about the many wrecks (some are visible) that litter the bottom of the sea. Photo opportunities abound on this tour, with the Falklands monuments visible from the water and the probability of dolphins following in the boat's wake.
 
Self-Guided Audio Walking Tour: Pick up your audio wand at the Visitor's Centre and go at your own pace around the town with a map and itinerary provided with the audio device. The program is available in five languages.
 
Dining Out
Enjoying a hearty draught and some British-style ‘fish and chips’ is a must and I would suggest you sample both at the Victory Bar on Philomel Hill. Be aware that it can get very crowded and this small establishment has limited seating, but definitely worth a stop. You can go classy or "pub" for lunch in Stanley, depending on your mood.
 
Malvina House Hotel, 3 Ross Road (across the street from Government Jetty), [2]. Dinner reservations may be required, especially during weekends.
Woodbine Cafe, 29 Fitzroy Road, ? 21002. Fish & chip shop, also offering pizzas, burgers, chicken, empanadas, and a selection of beers. 
Shorty's Diner, West Hillside,  +500 22855,. 1000-2030 weekdays; 1000-2000 weekends. Chargrilled burgers, steaks, curries, local fish and chips, local organic produce, homemade desserts. 
Uplands Goose Hotel: (Ross Road along the waterfront) The oldest and most venerable of the hotels in town, the restaurant is open for lunch and serves a fairly British menu (fish, lamb, shepherd's pie) using fresh Falkland ingredients.
Falklands Brasserie: (Philomel Street, just up from the Jetty) Reputedly the best restaurant in Stanley, the Brasserie serves a continental menu with steaks, seafood and fresh fish. The restaurant is handicap-accessible, too.
The Globe: (Philomel Street opposite the Jetty) Pub food at its finest ... fish and chips, chips with gravy, burgers, bangers-and-mash, washed down with British ale. On cold days, a peat fire warms the entire establishment.
 
Globe Tavern, Crozier Place,  22703. Located one block up the hill from the public jetty, offering beers as well as pub food such as fish and chips. Ask to meet all the lovely ladies that often pop in, and also go for the Karaoke on a Sunday night which is always good fun. 
Victory Bar, 1A Philomel Hill, 21199. Beer as well as hot food
 
Shopping
The majority of shops in central Stanley cater to the huge number of cruise ship passengers that pass through the town in the summer. FIC West Store, Ross Road. Open seven days a week and offering food, toiletries, phone cards, and other essentials. Capstan Gift Shop, Ross Road. Located across from the West Store, offers all manner of Falkland Islands gifts. Philatelic Bureau, Ross Road. Falkland Islands stamps and first-day covers are known throughout the world and can be purchased directly from the Philatelic Bureau.



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